DJ Lostboi & Torus – The Flash Review

After a year of silence, the Amsterdam – based label Queeste is back with a split album, where DJ Lostboi and Torus extend the typical ambient topos of the airport as a non-place, each one following an individual journey from airport to sea “during the blissful embers of fading summer”, aiming to what they describe as “the rare sight of the sun giving off a bright green lightburst into the horizon.”

According to her peculiar style which reminds of a dreamlike recollection, made of simple and minimal themes, the four tracks signed by the world emo boss Malibu alias DJ Lostboi sound feather-light and impalpable. The world outside is far away, just a projection trough the echoes of the seagulls in the opening track, “Open World”. Only the prosaic sounds of the digital environment are immune to the oniric elaboration, as the notification sounds or the registered voice of the answering machine, but their accommodating design reflects just a soft connection with reality. In “Ordinary People”, the whisper that follows starts a rarified voicemail, and a female voice blends in a heaven-like ambient built on distant piano and wavy mellow noises. But a journey like this means also hearing random music from the radio, which takes a brand new, lighter form in the delayed refrains over the sounds of factual ambient in “LB 100” and “Don’t Worry (Child Mix)”.

The plane landing in “Enter The Sun” starts as well the even more abstract and levitating journey of Torus, over an autotuned voice that drifts on wraparound noises like waves breaking on the beach. Then, “Pier”, the emotional peak of the album, mounts over a distant engine that turns out on decaying synths immersed in a minimal accompaniment until a light breeze enters the microphone. The arpeggios of “Radiator 540” defines a temporary but complete separation from the world, like a pure emotion being unfolded through the carefully handled deviations of the synths. Finally, a field recording of human interactions takes us back to reality, and the album collapses into the sea with the elegant and beatless dance of “Arrival”.

Rave music being rarified and deconstructed to a gentle reminiscence is a constant theme of the album, but unlike classics of post-rave like Burial, there’s no haunting memory trapping us in nostalgia. Dj Lostboi and Torus are able to mirror the feeling of watching photos of a happy moment of life while you are in a deeply calm and peaceful state: a safe place where all you can recollect are positive vibes.

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