King Krule – The Ooz Album Review

The ooz cover album

The Ooz follow in Six Feet Beneath the Moon footsteps, and it surpasses the original, bringing to the listener a more mature, and even more intense vision of Archie's universe.

True Panther Sounds

 October 13, 2017

8.5

Archie Marshall crafts spacious soundscapes, where he wanders and designs tall buildings and endless desolate spaces. In The Ooz, he consolidates the ties that keep him bound to the swarming city, of which he is a tangible emanation.

Although it is undoubtedly an album about an ended relationship, as it emerges from most of the lyrics, The Ooz carries on the urban mythology that Archie developed since his first album with the moniker King Krule, Six Feet Beneath the Moon. The loneliness of Archie Marshall, this is what this album is really about.

“I wish I was people”, sings Archie desperately, but with some serious irony, in “The Locomotive”, a dissonant ballad as powerful as the solemn stride of an ancient train. The total detachment from humanity is counterbalanced by a strive for a simpler life, one without all the suffering a complex mind as Archie’s one goes through every day.

In this already filthy world he “seems to sink lower”, as he mentions in “Biscuit Town”, the perfect intro for such an album, a declaration of total solitude, that hints at what seems to have triggered all this suffering: a vanished love, agonizingly analyzed in Lonely Blue.

The Ooz is an album about surviving in a world that is not yours, going through hallucinating nightmares as in “Half Man Half Shark” and “Slipping into filth/Lonely but surrounded”, as his father mumbles on “Bermondsey Bosom (Right)”.

King Krule’s typical broken jazz is even darker than in Six Feet Beneath the Moon, and it mixes with post HC, punk rock, trip hop and even dub. This mysterious musical entity is both visceral and refined, it crawls in the baseness of humanity avoiding to be corrupted by it. The Ooz, in Archie’s own words, “represents … your sweat, your nails, the sleep that comes out of your eyes, your dead skin. All of those creations that you have to refine. That’s where it comes from: It’s kind of about refining the subconscious creations that you do constantly”, and this album is the perfected incarnation of Marshall’s identity.

The Ooz follow in Six Feet Beneath the Moon footsteps, and it surpasses the original, bringing to the listener a more mature, and even more intense vision of Archie’s universe.

King Krule proved himself once again to be one of the most passionate and intimate artists alive: we are witnessing the rise of a star.

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