Klahrk & Kattie – It’s All Overkill review

Klahrk & Kattie It's All Overkill album artwork

Best things come in small packages. And, It’s All Overkill by Klahrk & Kattie is really a small package: only “4 new club tracks from myself and Kattie” as described on Bandcamp by Klahrk himself.

Another interesting information we can grasp from Bandcamp is the second tag for the album: “ambient”. An appropriate musical genre to tag this EP only if the implied environment is a club. Otherwise, the term ambient has nothing to do with this work since it is far too danceable and rhythmic for the typical sense of contemplation that the tag implies.

The accelerating groove and whirling vocals of the first track “Overkill”, immediately confirm what just said: It’s All Overkill explores and conceptualize the club space. With the second track, “Drag It”, the duo for sure presents more dreamlike passages, but still, the aggressive drums keep up with an absorbent (?) musical tempo. Here I think lies the true quality of the EP: the ability to perfectly balance experimentation and catchy song-writing. Klahrk & Kattie dance and mix carefree on the wall that separates pop EDM and niche electronic music. But there is more! They also make it seem as if these two different worlds only divided by an extremely thin line. Something like that had been done by The Prodigy in the ‘90s, and it seems that Klahrk & Kattie recognize this too, since the third track Pull sounds a lot like a tribute to the British band.

To close this “small package” we have the track “Yoledo”, which, with its centrifuge of screeches, speedy drums and robot-on-drugs vocals, wins the title of most experimental track of the EP, showing that this EP is more difficult than it seems. Since there is no description released by the label or the artists, I don’t know for sure what were the intentions behind this work, but we’re 99% sure that Klahrk & Kattie, leveraging their underground experience, simply looked into their eyes smiling and said: “Let’s simply have some fun!”

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